Newsblog

Welcoming The London Magazine

Welcoming The London Magazine

Litbreaker Media is happy to welcome The London Magazine to our network.

The London Magazine is England’s oldest literary periodical, with a history stretching back to 1732. Today – reinvigorated for a new century – the Magazine’s essence remains unchanged: it is a home for the best writing, and an indispensable feature on the British literary landscape.
Across a long life – spanning several incarnations – the pages of the Magazine have played host to a wide range of canonical writers, from Percy Bysshe Shelley, William Hazlitt and John Keats in the 18th-century, to T.S. Eliot, W.H. Auden and Evelyn Waugh in the early 20th-century. Meanwhile, in recent decades the Magazine has published work by giants of contemporary fiction and poetry such as William Boyd, Nadine Gordimer, and Derek Walcott.

Circlelogo2

Ooops!

Ooops!

Looks like something went wrong with that application. Sorry about that

Please fill in the form here and we’ll figure out what’s going on.

Thanks!

Litbreaker Welcomes Read It Forward

Litbreaker Welcomes Read It Forward

We welcome Read It Forward, a major book industry website, to the Litbreaker network. We’ll let them speak for themselves:

“At Read It Forward, we have a healthy obsession with authors, stories, and the readers who love them.

We’re here to help our community of avid readers find the loves of their literary lives.

Every week, we give away books we love, introduce you to amazing authors, and celebrate the love of reading in a shout-it-from-the-rooftops kind of way.

Read It Forward means we’re here to guide you towards a literary future full of books that surprise, inspire, and bring you happiness.

Happy Reading!”

Michigan Quarterly Review

Michigan Quarterly Review

 

We welcome Michigan Quarterly Review to the Litbreaker network of literary and academic sites. Our network includes The Paris Review, Harper’s Magazine, The American Academy of Poets and many other distinguished sites.

“Michigan Quarterly Review, founded in 1962, is the University of Michigan’s flagship journal, publishing each season a collection of essays, interviews, memoirs, fiction, poetry, and book reviews.”

 

Across the Margin

Across the Margin

 

Across the Margin, based in Brooklyn (Yes, Brooklyn indie bookstores and books sites, like Vol 1 Brooklyn, are awesome.) is a new member of the Litbreaker network. Here’s the dope on them:

“Across the Margin is an online magazine. One that aims to prove that long-form content still has a place, and can thrive online. At Across the Margin one can find an eclectic mix of fiction, editorials, and factual prose that explore the current state of the world around us, and the depths of our human nature.”

If you check them out, you won’t be disappointed!

Harper’s Magazine

Harper’s Magazine

Litbreaker welcomes Harper’s Magazine to our ad network.

 

Harper’s Magazine, the oldest general-interest monthly in America, explores the issues that drive our national conversation, through long-form narrative journalism and essays, and such celebrated features as the iconic Harper’s Index. With its emphasis on fine writing and original thought Harper’s provides readers with a unique perspective on politics, society, the environment, and culture. The essays, fiction, and reporting in the magazine’s pages come from promising new voices, as well as some of the most distinguished names in American letters, among them Annie Dillard, Barbara Ehrenreich, Jonathan Franzen, Mary Gaitskill, David Foster Wallace, and Tom Wolfe.

Welcoming a New Partner with International Flair

Welcoming a New Partner with International Flair

Litbreaker Media welcomes Asymptote:

 

Winner of the 2015 London Book Fair’s International Translation Initiative Award, Asymptote is an exciting new international journal dedicated to literary translation and bringing together in one place the best in contemporary writing. To date, the magazine has published literature from 96 countries and 72 languages, including hitherto unpublished work by writers and translators such as J. M. Coetzee, Patrick Modiano, Can Xue, Ismail Kadare, David Mitchell, Anne Carson, Haruki Murakami, Lydia Davis, and Herta Müller. We are interested in encounters between languages and the consequences of these encounters. Though a translation may never fully replicate the original in effect (thus our name, “asymptote”: the dotted line on a graph that a mathematical function may tend towards but never reach), it is in itself an act of creation.

Archives

Contact Us

Contact Us

Fields marked with an * are required